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metallicr

Thành Viên CLB Thiên Văn Nghiệp Dư TPHCM - HAAC
Staff member
#41
Giant 'Twisters' in the Lagoon Nebula

This Hubble Space Telescope (HST) image reveals a pair of one-half light-year long interstellar 'twisters' ? eerie funnels and twisted-rope structures ? in the heart of the Lagoon Nebula (Messier 8) which lies 5,000 light-years away in the direction of the constellation Sagittarius.

Credit: A. Caulet (ST-ECF, ESA) and NASA

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Id:eek:po9638b
Object:Lagoon Nebula, M 8, NGC 6523, Herschel 36, Messier 8
Type:Nebula

 

metallicr

Thành Viên CLB Thiên Văn Nghiệp Dư TPHCM - HAAC
Staff member
#42
A Glowing Pool of Light


NGC 3132 is a striking example of a planetary nebula. This expanding cloud of gas, surrounding a dying star, is known to amateur astronomers in the southern hemisphere as the 'Eight-Burst' or the 'Southern Ring' Nebula.

Credit: Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA/NASA/ESA)

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Id:eek:po9839a
Object:NGC 3132, Eight-Burst Nebula, Southern Ring Nebula, IRAS 10049-4011
Type:Nebula

 

metallicr

Thành Viên CLB Thiên Văn Nghiệp Dư TPHCM - HAAC
Staff member
#43
The Eskimo Nebula

In its first glimpse of the heavens following the successful December 1999 servicing mission, the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has captured a majestic view of a planetary nebula, the glowing remains of a dying, Sun-like star.

Credit: NASA, ESA, Andrew Fruchter (STScI), and the ERO team (STScI + ST-ECF)

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Id:heic9910a / opo0007a
Object:Eskimo Nebula, NGC 2392, IRAS 07262+2100
Type:Nebula

 

metallicr

Thành Viên CLB Thiên Văn Nghiệp Dư TPHCM - HAAC
Staff member
#44
NGC 2440

NGC 2440 is another planetary nebula ejected by a dying star, but it has a much more chaotic structure than NGC 2346. The central star of NGC2440 is one of the hottest known, with a surface temperature near 200,000 degrees Celsius. The complex structure of the surrounding nebula suggests to some astronomers that there have been periodic oppositely directed outflows from the central star, somewhat similar to that in NGC2346, but in the case of NGC 2440 these outflows have been episodic, and in different directions during each episode. The nebula is also rich in clouds of dust, some of which form long, dark streaks pointing away fromthe central star. In addition to the bright nebula, which glows becauseof fluorescence due to ultraviolet radiation from the hot star, NGC 2440 is surrounded by a much larger cloud of cooler gas which is invisible in ordinary light but can be detected with infrared telescopes. NGC 2440 lies about 4,000 light-years from Earth in thedirection of the constellation Puppis.

The Hubble Heritage team made this image from observations of NGC 2440acquired by Howard Bond (STScI) and Robin Ciardullo (Penn State).

Credit: NASA/ESA and The Hubble Heritage Team (AURA/STScI).

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Id:eek:po9935e
Object:NGC 2440, IRAS 07396-1805
Type:Nebula

 

metallicr

Thành Viên CLB Thiên Văn Nghiệp Dư TPHCM - HAAC
Staff member
#45
NGC 2346

NGC 2346 is a so-called "planetary nebula," which is ejected from Sun-like stars which are near the ends of their lives. NGC 2346 is remarkable because its central star is known to be actually a very close pair of stars, orbiting each other every 16 days. It is believed that the binary star was originally more widely separated. However, when one component of the binary evolved, expanded in size, and became a red-giant star, it literally swallowed its companion star. The companion star then spiralled downwards inside the red giant, and in the process spewed out gas into aring around the binary system. Later on, when the hot core of the red giant was exposed, it developed a faster stellar wind, which emerged perpendicularly to the ring and inflated two huge "bubbles". This two-stage process is believed to have resulted in the butterfly-like shape of the nebula. NGC 2346 lies about 2,000 light-years away from us, and is about one-third of a light-year in size.

Credit: NASA/ESA and The Hubble Heritage Team (AURA/STScI).

Info
Id:eek:po9935d
Object:NGC 2346, IRAS 07068-0043, V651 Mon
Type:Nebula

 

metallicr

Thành Viên CLB Thiên Văn Nghiệp Dư TPHCM - HAAC
Staff member
#46
Hubble Heritage Project's First Anniversary. A View of HH 32


HH 32 is an excellent example of a 'Herbig-Haro object', which is formed when young stars eject jets of material back into interstellar space. This object, about 1,000 light-years from Earth, is somewhat older than Hubble's variable nebula, and the wind from the bright central star has already cleared much of the dust out of the central region, thus exposing the star to direct view.

Many young stars, like the central object in HH 32, are surrounded by disks of gas and dust that form as additional material is attracted gravitationally from the surrounding nebula.

Credit: NASA/ESA/The Hubble Heritage Team (AURA/STScI)

Info

Id:eek:po9935a
Object:HH 32
Type:Nebula

 

metallicr

Thành Viên CLB Thiên Văn Nghiệp Dư TPHCM - HAAC
Staff member
#47
The Glowing Eye of NGC 6751

The Hubble telescope has spied a giant celestial 'eye', known as planetary nebula NGC 6751. The Hubble Heritage Project is releasing this picture to commemorate the Hubble telescope's tenth anniversary. Glowing in the constellation Aquila, the nebula is a cloud of gas ejected several thousand years ago from the hot star visible in its center.

Planetary nebulae have nothing to do with planets. They are shells of gas thrown off by Sun-like stars nearing the ends of their lives. The star's loss of its outer gaseous layers exposes the hot stellar core, whose strong ultraviolet radiation then causes the ejected gas to fluoresce as the planetary nebula.

Credit: NASA/ESA, The Hubble Heritage Team STScI/AURA)

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Id:eek:po0012a
Object:NGC 6751, IRAS 19032-0604
Type:Nebula

 

metallicr

Thành Viên CLB Thiên Văn Nghiệp Dư TPHCM - HAAC
Staff member
#48
Ants in Space?

From ground-based telescopes, the so-called "ant nebula" (Menzel 3, or Mz 3) resembles the head and thorax of a garden-variety ant. This dramatic NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image, showing 10 times more detail, reveals the "ant's" body as a pair of fiery lobes protruding from a dying, Sun-like star.

The Hubble images directly challenge old ideas about the last stages in the lives of stars. By observing Sun-like stars as they approach their deaths, the Hubble Heritage image of Mz 3 ? along with pictures of other planetary nebulae ? shows that our Sun's fate probably will be more interesting, complex, and striking than astronomers imagined just a few years ago.

Credit: NASA, ESA and the Hubble Heritage Team STScI/AURA)

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Id:heic0101a / opo0105a
Object:Ant Nebula, PN Mz 3, Menzel 3, IRAS 16133-5151
Type:Nebula

 

metallicr

Thành Viên CLB Thiên Văn Nghiệp Dư TPHCM - HAAC
Staff member
#49
N83B - massive infant stars rock their cradle

Extremely intense radiation from newly born, ultra-bright stars has blown a glowing spherical bubble in the nebula N83B, also known as NGC 1748. A new NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image has helped to decipher the complex interplay of gas and radiation of a star-forming region in a nearby galaxy. The image graphically illustrates just how these massive stars sculpt their environment by generating powerful winds that alter the shape of the parent gaseous nebula. These processes are also seen in our Milky Way in regions like the Orion Nebula.

The Hubble telescope is famous for its contribution to our knowledge about star formation in very distant galaxies. Although most of the stars in the Universe were born several billions of years ago, when the Universe was young, star formation still continues today. This new Hubble image shows a very compact star-forming region in a small part of one of our neighboring galaxies - the Large Magellanic Cloud. This galaxy lies only 165,000 light-years from our Milky Way and can easily be seen with the naked eye from the Southern Hemisphere.

Credit: ESA, NASA & Mohammad Heydari-Malayeri (Observatoire de Paris, France)

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Press Release
Id:heic0104a / opo0111a
Object:NGC 1748, N 83B, IRAS 04546-6915
Type:Nebula

 

metallicr

Thành Viên CLB Thiên Văn Nghiệp Dư TPHCM - HAAC
Staff member
#50
IC Beauty

The Hubble telescope reveals a rainbow of colours in this dying star, called IC 4406. Like many other so-called planetary nebulae, IC 4406 exhibits a high degree of symmetry. The nebula's left and right halves are nearly mirror images of the other. If we could fly around IC 4406 in a spaceship, we would see that the gas and dust form a vast donut of material streaming outward from the dying star. We don't see the donut shape in this photograph because we are viewing IC 4406 from the Earth-orbiting Hubble telescope. From this vantage point, we are seeing the side of the donut.

This side view allows us to see the intricate tendrils of material that have been compared to the eye's retina. In fact, IC 4406 is dubbed the 'Retina Nebula.'

Credit: NASA/ESA and The Hubble Heritage Team STScI/AURA)

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Press Release
Id:eek:po0214a
Object:IC 4406, IRAS 14192-4355
Type:Nebula

 

metallicr

Thành Viên CLB Thiên Văn Nghiệp Dư TPHCM - HAAC
Staff member
#51
Close-Up of M27, the Dumbbell Nebula

An aging star's last hurrah is creating a flurry of glowing knots of gas that appear to be streaking through space in this close-up image of the Dumbbell Nebula, taken with NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope.

The Dumbbell, a nearby planetary nebula residing more than 1,200 light-years away, is the result of an old star that has shed its outer layers in a glowing display of colour. The nebula, also known as Messier 27 (M27), was the first planetary nebula ever discovered. French astronomer Charles Messier spotted it in 1764.

Credit: NASA/ESA and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)

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Long Caption
Press Release
Id:eek:po0306a
Object: Dumbbell Nebula, M 27, NGC 6853, IRAS 19574+2234, Messier 27
Type:Nebula



Celestial Fireworks

Resembling the puffs of smoke and sparks from a summer fireworksdisplay in this image from NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, these delicate filaments are actually sheets of debris from a stellar explosion in a neighboring galaxy. Hubble's target was a supernova remnant within the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), a nearby, small companion galaxy to the Milky Way visible from the southern hemisphere.

Denoted N 49, or DEM L 190, this remnant is from a massive star that died in a supernova blast whose light would have reached Earth thousands of years ago. This filamentary material will eventually be recycled into building new generations of stars in the LMC. Our own Sun and planets are constructed from similar debris of supernovae that exploded in the Milky Way billions of years ago.

Credit: NASA/ESA and The Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)

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Long Caption
Press Release
Id:eek:po0320a
Object: DEM L 190, SNR 0525-66, LMC N 49
Type:Nebula



Firestorm of Star Birth Seen in a Local Galaxy

This festively colorful nebula, called NGC 604, is one of thelargest known seething cauldrons of star birth in a nearby galaxy. NGC 604 is similar to familiar star-birth regions inour Milky Way galaxy, such as the Orion Nebula, but it is vastlylarger in extent and contains many more recently formed stars.

This monstrous star-birth region contains more than 200 brilliant blue stars within a cloud of glowing gases some 1,300 light-year sacross, nearly 100 times the size of the Orion Nebula. By contrast,the Orion Nebula contains just four bright central stars. The bright stars in NGC 604 are extremely young by astronomical standards, having formed a mere 3 million years ago.

Credit: NASA/ESA and The Hubble Heritage Team (AURA/STScI)

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Long Caption
Press Release
Id:eek:po0330a
Object:NGC 604
Type:Nebula



The Heart of the Trifid Nebula

The Trifid Nebula, cataloged by astronomers as Messier 20 or NGC 6514, is a well-known region of star formation lying within our own Milky Way Galaxy. It is called the Trifid because the nebula is overlain by three bands of obscuring interstellar dust, giving it a trisected appearance as seen in small telescopes. The Trifid lies about 9,000 light-years (2,700 parsecs) from Earth, in the direction of the constellation Sagittarius.

Credit: NASA, ESA, and The Hubble Heritage Team (AURA/STScI)

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Long Caption
Id:eek:po0417b
Object:Trifid Nebula, M 20, NGC 6514, Messier 20
Type:Nebula



Object:NGC 1569, IRAS 0426+647P01

Supernova blast bonanza in nearby galaxy

The nearby dwarf galaxy NGC 1569 is a hotbed of vigorous star birth activity which blows huge bubbles and super-bubbles that riddle the main body of the galaxy. The galaxy?s vigorous ?star factories? are also manufacturing brilliant blue star clusters. This galaxy had a sudden and relatively recent onset of star birth 25 million years ago, which subsided about the time the very earliest human ancestors appeared on Earth.

In this new image, taken with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, The bubble structure is sculpted by the galactic super-winds and outflows caused by a colossal input of energy from collective supernova explosions that are linked with a massive episode of star birth.

The bubble-like structures seen in this image are made of hydrogen gas that glows when hit by the fierce winds and radiation from hot young stars and is racked by supernovae shocks. The first supernovae blew up when the most massive stars reached the end of their lifetimes roughly 20-25 million years ago. The environment in NGC 1569 is still turbulent and the supernovae may not only deliver the gaseous raw material needed for the formation of further stars and star clusters, but also actually trigger their birth in the tortured swirls of gas.

Credit: European Space Agency, NASA & Peter Anders (G”ttingen University Galaxy Evolution Group, Germany)

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Press Release
Id:heic0402a / opo0406a
Object:NGC 1569, IRAS 0426+647P01
Type:Galaxy, Nebula




Uncovering the Veil Nebula




This image is a stunning close-up of the Veil Nebula - the shattered remains of a supernova

that exploded some 5-10,000 years ago. The image provides a beautiful view of the

delicate, wispy structure resulting from this cosmic explosion. Also known as Cygnus Loop,

the Veil Nebula is located in the constellation of Cygnus, the Swan, and is about 1,500

light-years away from Earth.

This small portion of the Veil Nebula is located in the larger segment seen in its western

part (the top left corner of the large ground-based overview image). The entire structure

spans about 3 degrees, corresponding to about 6 full moons.

The image was taken with Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2). The

colour is produced by composite of three different images. The different colours indicate

emission from different kinds of atoms excited by the shock: blue shows oxygen, green

shows sulphur, and red shows hydrogen.

Credit: NASA, ESA, and the Hubble Heritage (STScI/AURA)-ESA/Hubble Collaboration.

Acknowledgment: J. Hester (Arizona State University)

Info


Id: heic0712b
Object: Veil Nebula, Cygnus Loop, NGC 6992, NGC 6995, NGC 6960, Cirrus Nebula,

LBN 191
Type: Nebula
Instru-ment: WFPC2

Field of view of NGC 2440




This is a 3°x3° field of view of NGC 2440 region.

Credit: Digitized Sky Survey 2

Info


Id: heic0703b
Object: NGC 2440
Type: Nebula, Star
Instru-ment: WFPC2

Extraterrestrial Fireworks




In the wake of Independence Day festivities surrounding the U.S. July 4th holiday,

astronomers and image processors at the Space Telescope Science Institute are releasing

the Hubble Space Telescope image of a cosmic explosion that is quite similar to fireworks

on Earth. In the nearby galaxy, the Small Magellanic Cloud, a massive star has exploded as

a supernova, and begun to dissipate its interior into a spectacular display of colorful

filaments.

The supernova remnant (SNR), known as "E0102" for short, is the greenish-blue shell of

debris just below the center of the Hubble image. Its name is derived from its cataloged

placement (or coordinates) in the celestial sphere. More formally known as 1E0102.2-7219,

it is located almost 50 light-years (15 parsecs) away from of the edge of the massive

star-forming region, N 76, also known as Henize 1956 in the Small Magellanic Cloud. This

delicate structure glowing a multitude of lavenders and peach hues, resides in the upper

right of the image.

The composition and thus, the coloring, of the diffuse remnant in comparison to its

star-forming neighbor is due to the presence of very large quantities of oxygen compared to

hydrogen. E0102 is a member of the oxygen-rich class of SNRs showing strong oxygen

and other more metal-like abundances in its optical and X-ray spectra, and an absence of

hydrogen and helium. N 76 in contrast is made up primarily of glowing hydrogen emission.

One explanation for the abundance of oxygen in the SNR is that the parent star was very

large and old, and had blown away most its hydrogen as stellar wind before it exploded. It

is surmised that the progenitor star that caused the supernova explosion may have been a

Wolf-Rayet. These stars, which can be upward of 20 times the mass of the sun and tens of

thousands times more luminous, are famous for having a strong stellar wind throughout

their lifetime. This stellar wind carried off material from the outer-most shells of the star

(the hydrogen and helium shells), leaving the next most abundant element, oxygen, as a

visible signature after the star exploded as a supernova.

Determined to be only about 2000 years old, E0102 is relatively young on astronomical

scales and is just beginning its interactions with the nearby interstellar medium. Young

supernova remnants like E0102 allow astronomers to examine material from the cores of

massive stars directly. This in turn gives insight on how stars form, their composition, and

the chemical enrichment of the surrounding area. As well, young remnants are a great

learning tool to better understand the physics of supernova explosions.

E0102 was observed in 2003 with the Hubble Advanced Camera for Surveys. Four filters

that isolate light from blue, visible, and infrared wavelengths and hydrogen emission were

combined with oxygen emission images of the SNR taken with the Wide Field Planetary

Camera 2 in 1995.

The Small Magellanic Cloud is a nearby dwarf galaxy to our own Milky Way. It is visible in

the Southern Hemisphere, in the direction of the constellation Tucana, and lies roughly

210,000 light-years (65 parsecs) distant.

Credit: NASA, ESA and the Hubble Heritage Team STScI/AURA)

Info

Press Release
Id: opo0635a
Object: 1E 0102.2-7219, E0102
Type: Nebula
Instru-ment: ACS

Cassiopeia A - The colourful aftermath of a violent stellar death




A new image taken with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope provides a detailed look

at the tattered remains of a supernova explosion known as Cassiopeia A (Cas A). It is the

youngest known remnant from a supernova explosion in the Milky Way. The new Hubble

image shows the complex and intricate structure of the star’s shattered fragments.

Credit: NASA, ESA, and the Hubble Heritage STScI/AURA)-ESA/Hubble Collaboration.

Acknowledgement: Robert A. Fesen (Dartmouth College, USA) and James Long

(ESA/Hubble)

Info


Id: heic0609a
Object: Cassiopeia A, Cas A, SNR 111.7-02.1, W 81, SN 1680
Type: Nebula
Instru-ment: ACS

Large and small stars in harmonious coexistence




The latest photo from the Hubble Space Telescope, presented at the 2006 General

Assembly of the International Astronomical Union in Prague this week, shows a star

forming region in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). This sharp image reveals a large

number of low-mass infant stars coexisting with young massive stars.

Credit: NASA, ESA

Info


Id: heic0607a
Object: LH 95
Type: Nebula
Instru-ment: ACS

Large and small stars in harmonious coexistence




The latest photo from the Hubble Space Telescope, presented at the 2006 General

Assembly of the International Astronomical Union in Prague this week, shows a star

forming region in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). This sharp image reveals a large

number of low-mass infant stars coexisting with young massive stars.

Credit: NASA, ESA

Info


Id: heic0607b
Object: LH 95
Type: Nebula
Instru-ment: ACS

NASA Space Observatories Glimpse Faint Afterglow of Nearby Stellar Explosion




Intricate wisps of glowing gas float amid a myriad of stars in this image created by

combining data from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope and Chandra X-ray

Observatory. The gas is a supernova remnant, cataloged as N132D, ejected from the

explosion of a massive star that occurred some 3,000 years ago. This titanic explosion took

place in the Large Magellanic Cloud, a nearby neighbor galaxy of our own Milky Way.

Credit: NASA, ESA, and The Hubble Heritage Team STScI/AURA)

Info

Id: opo0530a
Object: IRAS 05240-6948, N 132D, Large Magellanic Cloud, LMC
Type: Nebula
Instru-ment: ACS

Hubble Catches Scattered Light from the Boomerang Nebula




The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope caught the Boomerang Nebula in images taken

with the Advanced Camera for Surveys in early 2005. This reflecting cloud of dust and gas

has two nearly symmetric lobes of matter that are being ejected from a central star. Each

lobe of the nebula is nearly one light-year in length, making the total length of the nebula

half as long as the distance from our Sun to our nearest neighbors ? the alpha Centauri

stellar system, located roughly 4 light-years away. The Boomerang Nebula resides 5,000

light-years from Earth. Hubble's sharp view is able to resolve patterns and ripples in the

nebula very close to the central star that are not visible from the ground.

Credit: NASA, ESA and The Hubble Heritage Team STScI/AURA)

Info

Id: opo0525a
Object: Boomerang Nebula, IRAS 12419-5414
Type: Nebula
Instru-ment: ACS

A New View of the Helix Nebula




This composite image is a view of the colorful Helix Nebula taken with the Advanced

Camera for Surveys aboard NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope and the Mosaic II

Camera on the 4-meter telescope at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory in Chile.

The object is so large that both telescopes were needed to capture a complete view. The

Helix is a planetary nebula, the glowing gaseous envelope expelled by a dying, sun-like star.

The Helix resembles a simple doughnut as seen from Earth. But looks can be deceiving.

New evidence suggests that the Helix consists of two gaseous disks nearly perpendicular

to each other.

Credit: NASA, ESA, C.R. O'Dell (Vanderbilt University), and M. Meixner, P. McCullough,

and G. Bacon ( Space Telescope Science Institute)

Info

Id: opo0432d
Object: Helix Nebula, NGC 7293, IRAS 22267-2102
Type: Nebula
Instru-ment: ACS, Ground-based

Dying star creates fantasy-like sculpture of gas and dust




In this detailed view from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, the so-called Cat's

Eye Nebula looks like the penetrating eye of the disembodied sorcerer Sauron from the film

adaptation of "Lord of the Rings."

The nebula, formally catalogued NGC 6543, is every bit as inscrutable as the J.R.R.

Tolkien phantom character. Although the Cat's Eye Nebula was the first planetary nebula

ever to be discovered, it is one of the most complex planetary nebulae ever seen in space.

A planetary nebula forms when Sun-like stars gently eject their outer gaseous layers to

form bright nebulae with amazing twisted shapes.

Credit: ESA, NASA, HEIC and The Hubble Heritage Team STScI/AURA)

Info


Id: heic0414a / opo0427a
Object: Cat's Eye Nebula, NGC 6543, IRAS 17584+6638A
Type: Nebula
Instru-ment: ACS

V838 Monocerotis revisited: Space phenomenon imitates art




"Starry Night", Vincent van Gogh's famous painting, is renowned for its bold whorls of light

sweeping across a raging night sky. Although this image of the heavens came only from

the artist's restless imagination, a new picture from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space

Telescope bears remarkable similarities to the van Gogh work, complete with

never-before-seen spirals of dust swirling across trillions of kilometres of interstellar space.

This image, obtained with the Advanced Camera for Surveys on February 8, 2004, is

Hubble's latest view of an expanding halo of light around a distant star, named V838

Monocerotis (V838 Mon). The illumination of interstellar dust comes from the red

supergiant star at the middle of the image, which gave off a flashbulb-like pulse of light two

years ago. V838 Mon is located about 20,000 light-years away from Earth in the direction

of the constellation Monoceros, placing the star at the outer edge of our Milky Way galaxy.

Credit: NASA, the Hubble Heritage Team (AURA/STScI) and ESA

Info


Id: heic0405a / opo0410a
Object: V838 Mon, IRAS 07015-0346
Type: Star, Nebula
Instru-ment: ACS

Iridescent Glory of Nearby Planetary Nebula Showcased on Astronomy Day




In one of the largest and most detailed celestial images ever made, the coil-shaped Helix

Nebula is being unveiled tomorrow in celebration of Astronomy Day (Saturday, May 10).

The composite picture is a seamless blend of ultra-sharp NASA/ESA Hubble Space

Telescope HST) images combined with the wide view of the Mosaic Camera on the

National Science Foundation's 0.9-meter telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory, part

of the National Optical Astronomy Observatory, near Tucson, Ariz. Astronomers at the

Space Telescope Science Institute assembled these images into a mosaic. The mosaic was

then blended with a wider photograph taken by the Mosaic Camera. The image shows a

fine web of filamentary "bicycle-spoke" features embedded in the colorful red and blue gas

ring, which is one of the nearest planetary nebulae to Earth.

Because the nebula is nearby, it appears as nearly one-half the diameter of the full Moon.

This required HST astronomers to take several exposures with the Advanced Camera for

Surveys to capture most of the Helix. HST views were then blended with a wider photo

taken by the Mosaic Camera. The portrait offers a dizzying look down what is actually a

trillion-mile-long tunnel of glowing gases. The fluorescing tube is pointed nearly directly at

Earth, so it looks more like a bubble than a cylinder. A forest of thousands of comet-like

filaments, embedded along the inner rim of the nebula, points back toward the central star,

which is a small, super-hot white dwarf.

The tentacles formed when a hot "stellar wind" of gas plowed into colder shells of dust and

gas ejected previously by the doomed star. Ground-based telescopes have seen these

comet-like filaments for decades, but never before in such detail. The filaments may

actually lie in a disk encircling the hot star, like a collar. The radiant tie-die colours

correspond to glowing oxygen (blue) and hydrogen and nitrogen (red).

Valuable Hubble observing time became available during the November 2002 Leonid

meteor storm. To protect the spacecraft, including HST's precise mirror, controllers turned

the aft end into the direction of the meteor stream for about half a day. Fortunately, the

Helix Nebula was almost exactly in the opposite direction of the meteor stream, so Hubble

used nine orbits to photograph the nebula while it waited out the storm. To capture the

sprawling nebula, Hubble had to take nine separate snapshots.

Planetary nebulae like the Helix are sculpted late in a Sun-like star's life by a torrential gush

of gases escaping from the dying star. They have nothing to do with planet formation, but

got their name because they look like planetary disks when viewed through a small

telescope. With higher magnification, the classic "donut-hole" in the middle of a planetary

nebula can be resolved. Based on the nebula's distance of 650 light-years, its angular size

corresponds to a huge ring with a diameter of nearly 3 light-years. That's approximately

three-quarters of the distance between our Sun and the nearest star.

The Helix Nebula is a popular target of amateur astronomers and can be seen with

binoculars as a ghostly, greenish cloud in the constellation Aquarius. Larger amateur

telescopes can resolve the ring-shaped nebula, but only the largest ground-based telescopes

can resolve the radial streaks. After careful analysis, astronomers concluded the nebula

really isn't a bubble, but is a cylinder that happens to be pointed toward Earth.

Credit: NASA, NOAO, ESA, the Hubble Helix Nebula Team, M. Meixner (STScI), and

T.A. Rector (NRAO).

Info


Id: heic0307a / opo0311a
Object: Helix Nebula, NGC 7293, IRAS 22267-2102
Type: Nebula
Instru-ment: ACS

Hubble watches light echo from mysterious erupting star (October 2002 image)




This is the third in a sequence of four pictures from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space

Telescope's Advanced Camera for Surveys that dramatically demonstrates the echoing of

light through space caused by an unusual stellar outburst in January 2002.

The image was taken 28 October 2002. The image is combined from exposures taken

through blue (B), green (V), and infrared (I) filters.

Credit: NASA, European Space Agency, and H.E. Bond (STScI)

Info


Id: heic0304d / opo0310d
Object: V838 Mon, IRAS 07015-0346
Type: Star, Nebula
Instru-ment: ACS

Fireworks in the Sky




Glowing gaseous streamers of red, white, and blue - as well as green and pink - illuminate

the heavens like Fourth of July fireworks. The colorful streamers that float across the sky

in this photo taken by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope were created by the

universe's biggest firecracker, the titanic supernova explosion of a massive star.

The light from the exploding star reached Earth 320 years ago. The dead star's shredded

remains are called Cassiopeia A, or 'Cas A' for short. Cas A is the youngest known

supernova remnant in our Milky Way Galaxy and resides 10, 000 light-years away in the

constellation Cassiopeia, so the star actually blew up 10, 000 years before the light reached

Earth in the late 1600s.

Credit: NASA/ESA and The Hubble Heritage Team STScI/AURA)

Info

Press Release
Id: opo0215a
Object: Cassiopeia A, SNR 111.7-02.1
Type: Nebula
Instru-ment: WFPC2

Cone Nebula/NGC 2264 (ACS Full Field Image)




Resembling a nightmarish beast rearing its head from a crimson sea, this monstrous object

is actually an innocuous pillar of gas and dust. Called the Cone Nebula (and cataloged

NGC 2264) is so named because, in ground-based images, it has a conical shape. This giant

pillar resides in a turbulent star-forming region. NASA's Hubble Space Telescope imaged

the "Cone Nebula," a nebula close to home. It exhibits a craggy-looking mountaintop of cold

gas and dust that is a cousin to Hubble's iconic "pillars of creation" in the Eagle Nebula,

photographed in 1995.

Credit: NASA, H. Ford (JHU), G. Illingworth (UCSC/LO), M.Clampin (STScI), G. Hartig

(STScI), the ACS Science Team, and ESA

The ACS Science Team: H. Ford, G. Illingworth, M. Clampin, G. Hartig, T. Allen, K.

Anderson, F. Bartko, N. Benitez, J. Blakeslee, R. Bouwens, T. Broadhurst, R. Brown, C.

Burrows, D. Campbell, E. Cheng, N. Cross, P. Feldman, M. Franx, D. Golimowski, C.

Gronwall, R. Kimble, J. Krist, M. Lesser, D. Magee, A. Martel, W. J. McCann, G.

Meurer, G. Miley, M. Postman, P. Rosati, M. Sirianni, W. Sparks, P. Sullivan, H. Tran, Z.

Tsvetanov, R. White, and R. Woodruff.

Info

Id: heic0206f / opo0211f
Object: NGC 2264, Cone Nebula
Type: Nebula
Instru-ment: ACS
 

metallicr

Thành Viên CLB Thiên Văn Nghiệp Dư TPHCM - HAAC
Staff member
#52
Omega Nebula/Swan Nebula/M17 (ACS Full Field Image)




Peering into a celestial maternity ward called the Omega Nebula or M17, images from

NASA's Hubble Space Telescope revealed a watercolor fantasy-world of glowing gases,

where stars and perhaps embryonic planetary systems are forming.

Credit: NASA, H. Ford (JHU), G. Illingworth (UCSC/LO), M.Clampin (STScI), G. Hartig

(STScI), the ACS Science Team, and ESA

The ACS Science Team: H. Ford, G. Illingworth, M. Clampin, G. Hartig, T. Allen, K.

Anderson, F. Bartko, N. Benitez, J. Blakeslee, R. Bouwens, T. Broadhurst, R. Brown, C.

Burrows, D. Campbell, E. Cheng, N. Cross, P. Feldman, M. Franx, D. Golimowski, C.

Gronwall, R. Kimble, J. Krist, M. Lesser, D. Magee, A. Martel, W. J. McCann, G.

Meurer, G. Miley, M. Postman, P. Rosati, M. Sirianni, W. Sparks, P. Sullivan, H. Tran, Z.

Tsvetanov, R. White, and R. Woodruff.

Info

Id: heic0206g / opo0211g
Object: Swan Nebula, M 17, NGC 6618, Messier 17
Type: Nebula
Instru-ment: ACS

A Bow Shock Near a Young Star




The Hubble Space Telescope continues to reveal various stunning and intricate treasures

that reside within the nearby, intense star-forming region known as the Great Nebula in

Orion. One such jewel is the bow shock around the very young star, LL Ori, featured in

this Hubble Heritage image.

Credit: NASA/ESA and The Hubble Heritage Team STScI/AURA)

Info

Press Release
Id: opo0205a
Object: LL Orionis, NGC 1977 510, LL Ori
Type: Nebula, Star
Instru-ment: WFPC2

A Portrait of R136




The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has snapped a panoramic portrait of a vast,

sculpted landscape of gas and dust where thousands of stars are being born. This fertile

star-forming region, called the 30 Doradus Nebula, has a sparkling stellar centerpiece: the

most spectacular cluster of massive stars in our cosmic neighborhood of about 25 galaxies.

The mosaic picture shows that ultraviolet radiation and high-speed material unleashed by

the stars in the cluster, called R136 [the large blue blob left of center], are weaving a

tapestry of creation and destruction, triggering the collapse of looming gas and dust clouds

and forming pillar-like structures that are incubators for nascent stars.

Credit: NASA/ESA, N. Walborn and J. Mamz-Apellaniz ( Space Telescope Science

Institute, Baltimore, MD), R. Barba (La Plata Observatory, La Plata, Argentina)

Info

Press Release
Id: opo0121a
Object: 30 Doradus Nebula
Type: Nebula
Instru-ment: WFPC2

Nebula N 81




NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has peered deep into a neighboring galaxy to reveal

details of the formation of new stars. Hubble's target was a newborn star cluster within the

Small Magellanic Cloud, a small galaxy that is a satellite of our own Milky Way. The new

images show young, brilliant stars cradled within a nebula, or glowing cloud of gas,

cataloged as N 81.

Credit: NASA/ESA and The Hubble Heritage Team STScI/AURA)

Info

Press Release
Id: opo0030a
Object: N 81, Blob, Small Magellanic Cloud, SMC, NGC 292
Type: Nebula
Instru-ment: WFPC2

Peering into the Heart of the Crab Nebula




In the year 1054 A.D., Chinese astronomers were startled by the appearance of a new

star, so bright that it was visible in broad daylight for several weeks. Today, the Crab

Nebula is visible at the site of that bright star.

Credit: NASA/ESA and The Hubble Heritage Team STScI/AURA)

Info

Press Release
Id: opo0015a
Object: Crab Nebula, M 1, NGC 1952, SN 1054A, IRAS 05314+2200, Messier 1
Type: Nebula
Instru-ment: WFPC2

A Tantalising Veil




This delicate Hubble Space Telescope image shows a tiny portion of the Cygnus loop, a

supernova remnant in the constellation of Cygnus, the Swan. Measurements on this

super-detailed image of a cosmic veil shows that the original supernova explosion took

place only 5, 000 years ago.

Credit: ESA & Digitized Sky Survey (Caltech)

Info

Id: heic0006b
Object: Cygnus Loop, Veil Nebula, NGC 6960
Type: Nebula
Instru-ment: WFPC2

Southern Crab Nebula




A tempestuous relationship between an unlikely pair of stars may have created an oddly

shaped, gaseous nebula that resembles an hourglass nestled within an hourglass.

The possible creators of these shapes cannot be seen at all in this Wide Field and Planetary

Camera 2image. It's a pair of aging stars buried in the glow of the tiny, central nebula.

Credit: Romano Corradi, Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, Tenerife, Spain; Mario Livio,

Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, Md.; Ulisse Munari, Osservatorio

Astronomico di Padova-Asiago, Italy; HugoSchwarz, Nordic Optical Telescope, Canarias,

Spain; and NASA/ESA

Info

Press Release
Id: opo9932b
Object: IRAS 14085-5112, Southern Crab Nebula
Type: Nebula
Instru-ment: WFPC2

Southern Crab Nebula




A tempestuous relationship between an unlikely pair of stars may have created an oddly

shaped, gaseous nebula that resembles an hourglass nestled within an hourglass.

This image shows the small nebula that is embedded in the centre of the larger one (you

can see the whole nebula by searching for opo9932a in the search form).

Credit: Romano Corradi, Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, Tenerife, Spain; Mario Livio,

Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, Md.; Ulisse Munari, Osservatorio

Astronomico di Padova-Asiago, Italy; HugoSchwarz, Nordic Optical Telescope, Canarias,

Spain; and NASA/ESA

Info

Press Release
Id: opo9932c
Object: IRAS 14085-5112, Southern Crab Nebula
Type: Nebula
Instru-ment: WFPC2

Planetary Nebula NGC 7027




This composite colour image of NGC 7027 is among the first data of a planetary nebula

taken with NICMOS. This picture is actually composed of three separate images taken at

different wavelengths. The red colour represents cool molecular hydrogen gas, the most

abundant gas in the universe.

Credit: William B. Latter (SIRTF Science Center/Caltech) and NASA/ESA

Info

Press Release
Id: opo9811d
Object: NGC 7027
Type: Nebula
Instru-ment: NICMOS

Hubble's Planetary Nebula Gallery. A View of NGC 6826




NGC 6826's eye-like appearance is marred by two sets of blood-red 'fliers' that lie

horizontally across the image. The surrounding faint green 'white' of the eye is believed to

be gas that made up almost half of the star's mass for most of its life. The hot remnant star

(in the centre of the green oval) drives a fast wind into older material, forming a hot interior

bubble which pushes the older gas ahead of it to form a bright rim. (The star is one of the

brightest stars in any planetary.) NGC 6826 is 2, 200 light- years away in the constellation

Cygnus. The Hubble telescope observation was taken Jan. 27, 1996 with the Wide Field

and Planetary Camera 2.

Credit: Bruce Balick (University of Washington), Jason Alexander (University of

Washington), Arsen Hajian (U.S. Naval Observatory), Yervant Terzian (Cornell

University), Mario Perinotto (University of Florence, Italy), Patrizio Patriarchi (Arcetri

Observatory, Italy) and NASA/ESA

Info

Press Release
Id: opo9738d
Object: NGC 6826, Blinking Planetary, IRAS 19434+5024
Type: Nebula
Instru-ment: WFPC2

Hubble's Planetary Nebula Gallery. A View of Hubble 5




Hubble 5 is a striking example of a 'butterfly' or bipolar (two-lobed) nebula. The heat

generated by fast winds causes each of the lobes to expand, much like a pair of balloons

with internal heaters. This observation was taken Sept. 9, 1997 by the Hubble telescope's

Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2. Hubble 5 is 2, 200 light-years away in the

constellation Sagittarius.

Credit: Bruce Balick (University of Washington), Vincent Icke (Leiden University, The

Netherlands), Garrelt Mellema (Stockholm University), and NASA/ESA

Info

Press Release
Id: opo9738f
Object: Hubble 5
Type: Nebula
Instru-ment: WFPC2

Hubble's Planetary Nebula Gallery. A View of NGC 7009




NGC 7009 has a bright central star at the centre of a dark cavity bounded by a

football-shaped rim of dense, blue and red gas. The cavity and its rim are trapped inside

smoothly-distributed greenish material in the shape of a barrel and comprised of the star's

former outer layers. At larger distances, and lying along the long axis of the nebula, a pair

of red 'ansae', or 'handles' appears. Each ansa is joined to the tips of the cavity by a long

greenish jet of material. The handles are clouds of low-density gas. NGC 7009 is 1, 400

light-years away in the constellation Aquarius. The Hubble telescope observation was

taken April 28, 1996 by the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2.

Credit: Bruce Balick (University of Washington), Jason Alexander (University of

Washington), Arsen Hajian (U.S. Naval Observatory), Yervant Terzian (Cornell

University), Mario Perinotto (University of Florence, Italy), Patrizio Patriarchi (Arcetri

Observatory, Italy), NASA/ESA

Info

Press Release
Id: opo9738g
Object: NGC 7009, Saturn Nebula, IRAS 21014-1133
Type: Nebula
Instru-ment: WFPC2

The Orion Nebula OMC-1 Region




Light from a few foreground stars seen in the WFPC2 image provides only a hint of the

many other stars embedded in this dense cloud.

Credit: C. Robert O'Dell, Shui Kwan Wong (Rice University) and NASA/ESA

Info

Press Release
Id: opo9713b
Object: M42, Orion Nebula, NGC 1976, Messier 42
Type: Nebula
Instru-ment: WFPC2

NGC 604 in Galaxy M33




This is a Hubble Space Telescope image (right) of a vast nebula called NGC 604, which

lies in the neighboring spiral galaxy M33, located 2.7 million light-years away in the

constellation Triangulum.

Credit: Hui Yang (University of Illinois) and NASA/ESA

Info

Press Release
Id: opo9627c
Object: NGC 604, M 33, NGC 598, IRAS 01310+3024, Messier 33
Type: Nebula
Instru-ment: WFPC2

The Crab Nebula




This picture shows a Hubble Space Telescope image of the inner parts of the Crab. The

pulsar itself is visible as the left of the pair of stars near the centre of the frame.

Credit: Jeff Hester and Paul Scowen (Arizona State University), and NASA/ESA

Info

Press Release
Id: opo9622a1
Object: Crab Nebula, M 1, NGC 1952, IRAS 05314+2200, Messier 1
Type: Nebula
Instru-ment: WFPC2

Cometary Knots around a Dying Star




These gigantic, tadpole-shaped objects are probably the result of a dying star's last gasps.

Dubbed 'cometary knots' because their glowing heads and gossamer tails resemble comets,

the gaseous objects probably were formed during a star's final stages of life.

Credit: Robert O'Dell, Kerry P. Handron (Rice University, Houston, Texas) and

NASA/ESA

Info

Press Release
Id: opo9613b
Object: Helix Nebula, NGC 7293, IRAS 22267-2102
Type: Nebula
Instru-ment: WFPC2

Stellar Death Process




This Hubble Space Telescope image of planetary nebula NGC 7027 shows remarkable

new details of the process by which a star like the Sun dies.

New features include: faint, blue, concentric shells surrounding the nebula; an extensive

network of red dust clouds throughout the bright inner region; and the hot central white

dwarf, visible as a white dot at the center.

Credit: H. Bond (STScI) and NASA/ESA

Info

Press Release
Id: opo9605a
Object: NGC 7027
Type: Nebula
Instru-ment: WFPC2

The Center of the Orion Nebula




This spectacular colour panorama of the centre the Orion nebula is one of the largest

pictures ever assembled from individual images taken with the Hubble Space Telescope.

The picture, seamlessly composited from a mosaic of 15 separate fields, covers an area of

sky about five percent the area covered by the full Moon.

Credit: C.R. O'Dell (Rice University), and NASA/ESA

Info

Press Release
Id: opo9545a1
Object: Great Orion Nebula, M 42, NGC 1976, Messier 42
Type: Nebula
Instru-ment: WFPC2

The Cygnus Loop




This image shows a small portion of a nebula called the 'Cygnus Loop.' Covering a region

on the sky six times the diameter of the full Moon, the Cygnus Loop is actually the

expanding blastwave from a stellar cataclysm - a supernova explosion - which occurred

about 15, 000 years ago.

Credit: Jeff Hester (Arizona State University) and NASA/ESA

Info

Press Release
Id: opo9511a
Object: Cygnus Loop, SNR 074.0-08.5
Type: Nebula
Instru-ment: WFPC2

The Cat's Eye Nebula




This Hubble Space Telescope image shows one of the most complex planetary nebulae

ever seen, NGC 6543, nicknamed the 'Cat's Eye Nebula.' Hubble reveals surprisingly

intricate structures including concentric gas shells, jets of high-speed gas and unusual

shock-induced knots of gas. Estimated to be 1, 000 years old, the nebula is a visual 'fossil

record' of the dynamics and late evolution of a dying star.

Credit: J.P. Harrington and K.J. Borkowski (University of Maryland), and NASA/ESA

Info

Press Release
Id: opo9501a
Object: Cat's Eye Nebula, NGC 6543, IRAS 17584+6638A
Type: Nebula
Instru-ment: WFPC2

Eta Carinae




A NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope "natural color" image of the material surrounding

the star Eta Carinae, as imaged by the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC-2).

Credit: J. Hester/Arizona state University, NASA/ESA

Info

Press Release
Id: opo9409a
Object: Eta Carinae, IRAS 10431-5925
Type: Nebula
Instru-ment: WFPC2

Milky-Way towards the constellation of Cygnus




A wide-field ground-based image of the Milky Way plane. The constellation of Cygnus,

where the veil nebula is located, appears in the top of the image.

Credit: A. Fujii

Info


Id: heic0712h
Object: Veil Nebula, Cygnus Loop, NGC 6992, NGC 6995, NGC 6960, Cirrus Nebula,

LBN 191
Type: Nebula
Instru-ment: Ground-based

A String of 'Cosmic Pearls' Surrounds an Exploding Star




Two decades ago, astronomers spotted one of the brightest exploding stars in more than

400 years.

Since that first sighting, the doomed star, called Supernova 1987A, has continued to

fascinate astronomers with its spectacular light show. The NASA/ESA Hubble Space

Telescope is one of many observatories that has been monitoring the blast's aftermath.

This image shows the entire region around the supernova. The most prominent feature in

the image is a ring with dozens of bright spots. A shock wave of material unleashed by the

stellar blast is slamming into regions along the ring's inner regions, heating them up, and

causing them to glow. The ring, about a light-year across, was probably shed by the star

about 20,000 years before it exploded.

Astronomers detected the first bright spot in 1997, but now they see dozens of spots around

the ring. Only Hubble can see the individual bright spots. In the next few years, the entire

ring will be ablaze as it absorbs the full force of the crash. The glowing ring is expected to

become bright enough to illuminate the star's surroundings, providing astronomers with new

information on how the star expelled material before the explosion.

The pink object in the centre of the ring is debris from the supernova blast. The glowing

debris is being heated by radioactive elements, principally titanium 44, created in the

explosion. The debris will continue to glow for many decades.

The origin of a pair of faint outer red rings, located above and below the doomed star, is a

mystery. The two bright objects that look like car headlights are a pair of stars in the Large

Magellanic Cloud. The supernova is located 163,000 light-years away in the Large

Magellanic Cloud.

The image was taken in December 2006 with Hubble's Advanced Camera for Surveys.

Credit: NASA, ESA, and R. Kirshner (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics)

Info


Id: heic0704a
Object: SN 1987A
Type: Star, Nebula
Instru-ment: WFPC2, NICMOS

Carina Nebula landscapes




[top] - An approximately one-light-year tall "pillar" of cold hydrogen towers above the wall

of the molecular cloud. The 2.5-million-year-old star cluster called Trumpler 14 appears at

the right side of the image. A small nugget of cold molecular hydrogen, called a Bok

globule, is silhouetted against the star cluster.

[middle] – Detailed view of the central portion of the Carina Nebula near the so-called

Keyhole Nebula.

[bottom] – These great clouds of cold hydrogen resemble summer afternoon thunderheads.

They tower above the surface of a molecular cloud on the edge of the nebula. So-called

"elephant trunk" pillars resist being heated and eaten away by blistering ultraviolet radiation

from the nebula’s brightest stars.

Credit: NASA, ESA, N. Smith (University of California, Berkeley), and The Hubble

Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)

Info


Id: heic0707e
Object: NGC 3372, Carina Nebula
Type: Nebula
Instru-ment: ACS

Hubble reveals NGC 2440




This image of NGC 2440 shows the colourful “last hurrah” of a star like our Sun. The star

is ending its life by casting off its outer layers of gas, which formed a cocoon around the

star’s remaining core. Ultraviolet light from the dying star makes the material glow. The

burned-out star, called a white dwarf, is the white dot in the centre.

Credit: NASA, ESA, and K. Noll (STScI)

Info


Id: heic0703a
Object: NGC 2440
Type: Nebula, Star
Instru-ment: WFPC2

Ground-Based Image of the Star-Forming Region NGC 281




This wide-field view of the star-forming region NGC 281 in the constellation Cassiopeia

was taken with the WIYN 0.9-meter telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory near

Tucson, AZ.

Credit: T.A. Rector/University of Alaska Anchorage and WIYN/AURA/NSF

Info

Press Release
Id: opo0613b
Object: NGC 281, bok globules
Type: Nebula
Instru-ment: Ground-based

Orion in miniature




A massive star is illuminating this small region, called M43, and sculpting the landscape of

dust and gas. Astronomers call the area a miniature Orion Nebula because of its small size

and the single star that is shaping it. The Orion Nebula itself is much larger and has four

hefty stars that are carving the dust-and-gas terrain.

Credit: NASA, ESA, M. Robberto ( Space Telescope Science Institute/ESA) and the

Hubble Space Telescope Orion Treasury Project Team

Info


Id: heic0601c
Object: Orion Nebula, M 42, M 43, Messier 42, Messier 43
Type: Nebula
Instru-ment: ACS

The Orion Nebula’s biggest stars




Packed into the centre of this region are bright lights of the Trapezium stars, the four

heftiest stars in the Orion Nebula. Ultraviolet light unleashed by these stars is carving a

cavity in the nebula and disrupting the growth of hundreds of smaller stars. The dark speck

near the bottom, right of the image is a silhouette of an edge-on disk encircling a young

star. Another whitish-looking disk is visible near the bottom, left, just above the two bright

stars. This disk is encased in a bubble of gas and dust.

Credit: NASA, ESA, M. Robberto ( Space Telescope Science Institute/ESA) and the

Hubble Space Telescope Orion Treasury Project Team

Info


Id: heic0601d
Object: Orion Nebula, M 42, M 43, Messier 42, Messier 43
Type: Nebula
Instru-ment: ACS
 

metallicr

Thành Viên CLB Thiên Văn Nghiệp Dư TPHCM - HAAC
Staff member
#53
Over the edge




This dark red column shows an illuminated edge of the cavity wall.

Credit: NASA, ESA, M. Robberto ( Space Telescope Science Institute/ESA) and the

Hubble Space Telescope Orion Treasury Project Team

Info


Id: heic0601e
Object: Orion Nebula, M 42, M 43, Messier 42, Messier 43
Type: Nebula
Instru-ment: ACS

Failing stars




The faint red stars in this close-up image are the myriad brown dwarfs that Hubble spied

for the first time in the Orion Nebula in visible light. Sometimes called “failed stars,” brown

dwarfs are cool objects that are too small to be ordinary stars because they cannot sustain

nuclear fusion in their cores the way our Sun does.

Credit: NASA, ESA, M. Robberto ( Space Telescope Science Institute/ESA) and the

Hubble Space Telescope Orion Treasury Project Team

Info


Id: heic0601f
Object: Orion Nebula, M 42, M 43, Messier 42, Messier 43
Type: Nebula
Instru-ment: ACS

Sculpting the landscape




This glowing region reveals arcs and bubbles formed when stellar winds – streams of

charged particles ejected by the Trapezium stars – collide with material.

Credit: NASA, ESA, M. Robberto ( Space Telescope Science Institute/ESA) and the

Hubble Space Telescope Orion Treasury Project Team

Info


Id: heic0601g
Object: Orion Nebula, M 42, M 43, Messier 42, Messier 43
Type: Nebula
Instru-ment: ACS

Pillars of gas




These dense, dark pillars of dust and gas are resisting erosion from intense ultraviolet light

released by the Orion Nebula’s biggest stars.

Credit: NASA, ESA, M. Robberto ( Space Telescope Science Institute/ESA) and the

Hubble Space Telescope Orion Treasury Project Team

Info


Id: heic0601h
Object: Orion Nebula, M 42, M 43, Messier 42, Messier 43
Type: Nebula
Instru-ment: ACS

The surroundings of the Crab Nebula




This composite shows: 1) The constellation Taurus (lower left) photographed by the avid

astrophotographer Akira Fujii. 2) A two-colour image (right) shows the surroundings of the

Crab Nebula. It was composed from Digitized Sky Survey 2 images, and 3) The new

NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image (upper left) of the entire Crab Nebula in

super high resolution.

Credit: Akira Fujii, Davide De Martin (ESA/Hubble) and NASA, ESA & Allison Loll/Jeff

Hester (Arizona State University)

Info


Id: heic0515b
Object: Crab Nebula, M 1, NGC 1952, IRAS 05314+2200, Messier 1
Type: Nebula
Instru-ment: WFPC2, Ground-based

The North America Nebula




This image is a composite from black and white images taken with the Palomar

Observatory's 48-inch (1.2 meter) Samuel Oschin Telescope as a part of the second

National Geographic Palomar Observatory Sky Survey (POSS II). The images were

recorded on two glass photographic plates - one sensitive to red light and the other to blue

and later they were digitized. In order to produce the colour image seen here a total of 62

different frames were processed with the ESA/ESO/NASA Photoshop FITS Liberator by

Italian amateur astronomer Davide De Martin - 31 frames for each colour band, coming

from 4 different plates taken from 1990 to 1993. The original file is 14,264 x 15,429 pixels

with a resolution of about 1 arc-second per pixel. The image covers an area of sky larger

than 4° x 4.3° (for comparison, the Full Moon is about 0.5° in diameter).

Credit: Davide De Martin (ESA/Hubble), the ESA/ESO/NASA Photoshop FITS Liberator

& Digitized Sky Survey 2

Info

Id: heic0510a
Object: NGC 7000
Type: Nebula
Instru-ment: Ground-based

The Cat’s Eye Nebula imaged with the Nordic Optical Telescope




An enormous but extremely faint halo of gaseous material surrounds the Cat’s Eye Nebula

and is over three light-years across. Within the past years some planetary nebulae been

found to have halos like this one, likely formed of material ejected during earlier active

episodes in the star's evolution – most likely some 50,000 to 90,000 years ago.

This image was taken by Romano Corradi with the Nordic Optical Telescope on La Palma

in the Canary Islands. The image is constructed from two narrow-band exposures showing

oxygen atoms (1800 seconds, in blue) and nitrogen atoms (1800 seconds, in red).

Credit: Nordic Optical Telescope and Romano Corradi (Isaac Newton Group of

Telescopes, Spain)

Info


Id: heic0414b
Object: Cat's Eye Nebula, NGC 6543, IRAS 17584+6638A
Type: Nebula
Instru-ment: Ground-based

Hubble views suspected stellar survivor from 1572 A.D. supernova explosion




These images show the location of a suspected runaway companion star to a titanic

supernova explosion witnessed in the year 1572 by the great Danish astronomer Tycho

Brahe and other astronomers of that era. This discovery provides the first direct evidence

supporting the long-held belief that Type Ia supernovae come from binary star systems

containing a normal star and a burned-out white dwarf star. When the dwarf ultimately

explodes by being overfueled by the companion star, the companion is slung away from the

demised star. The Hubble Space Telescope played a key role by precisely measuring the

surviving star's motion against the sky background.

[Right Image]

A Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 image of a small section of sky

containing the candidate star. The star is like our Sun except several billion years older. It is

moving through space at three times the speed of the other stars in its neighbourhood.

Hubble's sharp view allowed for a measurement of the star's motion, based on images

taken in 1999 and 2003. The image consists of a single greyscale Hubble exposure

colorized with the help of data from Digitized Sky Survey 2.

[Left Image]

The Hubble view is superimposed on this wide-field view of the region enveloped by the

expanding bubble of the supernova explosion; the bubble and candidate star are at

approximately the same distance, 10,000 light-years. The star is noticeably offset from the

geometric centre of the bubble. The colours in the Chandra X-Ray image of the hot bubble

show different X-ray energies, with red, green, and blue representing low, medium, and

high energies, respectively. (The image is cut off at the bottom because the southernmost

region of the remnant fell outside the field of view of the Chandra camera.)

The results of this research, led by Pilar Ruiz-Lapuente of the University of Barcelona, are

being published in the Oct. 28 British science journal Nature. The co-authors are Fernando

Comeron (European Southern Observatory), Javier Mendez (University of Barcelona and

Isaac Newton Group), Ramon Canal (University of Barcelona), Stephen Smartt (Institute

of Astronomy, Cambridge), Alex Filippenko (University of California, Berkeley), Robert

Kurucz (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics), Ryan Chornock and Ryan Foley

(University of California, Berkeley), Vallery Stanishev (Stockholm University), and Rodrigo

Ibata (Observatory of Strasbourg).

Credit: NASA/ESA, CXO and P. Ruiz-Lapuente (University of Barcelona)

Info


Id: heic0415a / opo0434a
Object: Tycho's SN, SN 1572A
Type: Star, Nebula
Instru-ment: WFPC2

An example of an image created with ESA/ESO/NASA Photoshop FITS Liberator




This previously unreleased colour image of the planetary nebula NGC 5979 was combined

from raw FITS files with the ESA/ESO/NASA Photoshop FITS Liberator. In the top row

the raw greyscale images are seen. Four individual exposures were combined to form this

colour image and the colour filters for the individual exposures are indicated. The number

refers to the colour, or wavelength, of light that the filter allows through. This is measured

in nanometres (a millionth of a millimetre). The N’s and W’s in the filter name refer to

whether the filter is a narrow-band (N) or a wide-band filter (W). The second row shows

the individual exposures after a colorising layer has been applied in Photoshop.

Credit: ESA, ESO and NASA

Info

Id: heic0412b
Object: NGC 5979, IRAS Z15434-6103
Type: Nebula, Miscellaneous
Instru-ment: N/A

The remarkable Red Rectangle: Stairway to heaven?




This image, taken with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, reveals startling new

details of one of the most unusual nebulae known in our Galaxy. Catalogued as HD 44179,

this nebula is more commonly called the “Red Rectangle” because of its unique shape and

colour as seen with ground-based telescopes.

Hubble has revealed a wealth of new features in the Red Rectangle that cannot be seen by

ground-based telescopes looking through the Earth’s turbulent atmosphere. Details of the

Hubble study were published in the April 2004 issue of The Astronomical Journal.

Credit: NASA/ESA, Hans Van Winckel (Catholic University of Leuven, Belgium) and

Martin Cohen (University of California, USA)

Info


Id: heic0408a / opo0411a
Object: Red Rectangle, HD 44179, IRAS 06176-1036
Type: Nebula
Instru-ment: WFPC2

Simulating the Red Rectangle




The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has revealed a wealth of new features in the

Red Rectangle that cannot be seen with ground-based telescopes looking through the

Earth’s turbulent atmosphere. Whereas the origins of many of the features in this dying

star still remain hidden, some are well explained by theorists like the Dutch scientist

Vincent Icke from Leiden University in the Netherlands.

In 1981 Vincent Icke and collaborators showed that a spherical gas ejection from a dying

star hitting a dust torus would give rise to shocks that can produce cone-like outflows

similar to the two cones seen in the Hubble image.

Meteorologists produce weather forecasts by advanced calculations of temperatures,

pressures, velocities and densities for the air masses in our atmosphere and, to some

degree, theorists like Icke are doing exactly the same for objects in space. Whether

modelling the weather in Earth’s atmosphere or the processes in distant gaseous nebulae,

scientists calculate the motion of the gas by using a complicated set of expressions known

as hydrodynamic equations. This is a very demanding process, possible only on fast

computers using sophisticated computer models.

Most of the matter in the Universe is in the form of gas. The weather on Earth gives rise to

spectacular patterns such as thunderclouds and tornadoes in the air masses here. Likewise,

the ‘weather’ in gas clouds in space, like the Red Rectangle, can be fascinating.

Weather prediction here on Earth is difficult enough, but in space the actual

three-dimensional distribution of the gas itself is not known and there are also many local

effects that may play a part in shaping the nebula, such as the distribution of the dust

around the nebula and the chemistry of this dust.

Of the many different parameters in Vincent Icke’s calculations, only the density of the gas

and the dust are observed in the Hubble image. The reflection of the gas and dust are

shown in this simulated image. The colours show what one would see in scattered light.

Blue light scatters more than red (the same process that makes the sky blue and sunsets

red here on Earth). The ejected blobs of gas and dust look reddish, the background nebula

is whiter. The three images are a time sequence with about 600 years between and show

how the Red Rectangle may have been created. Image number 3 shows a state similar to

how we observe the Red Rectangle with Hubble.

Credit: ESA and Vincent Icke (Leiden University, the Netherlands)

Info


Id: heic0408b
Object: Red Rectangle, HD 44179, IRAS 06176-1036
Type: Illustration, Nebula
Instru-ment: N/A

Demise in ice and fire




The Bug Nebula, NGC 6302, is one of the brightest and most extreme planetary nebulae

known. At its centre lies a superhot, dying star smothered in a blanket of hailstones. A new

Hubble image reveals fresh detail in the wings of this cosmic butterfly.

Most planetary nebulae are distinctive, but few are as extreme as NGC 6302, also known

as the Bug Nebula. The fiery, dying star at its centre is shrouded by a blanket of icy

hailstones.

Credit: ESA/NASA and Albert Zijlstra

Info


Id: heic0407a
Object: Bug Nebula, Bipolar Nebula, NGC 6302, IRAS 17103-3702
Type: Nebula, Star
Instru-ment: WFPC2

WFPC2 Mosaic of NGC 604 in M33




This full mosaic WFPC2 image shows a slightly larger area around NGC 604. The scale of

this image is 2.5 arcminutes along the bottom.

Credit: NASA/ESA and The Hubble Heritage Team (AURA/STScI)

Info

Press Release
Id: opo0330b
Object: NGC 304M 33, IRAS F01310+3024, Messier 33
Type: Nebula
Instru-ment: WFPC2

Helix Nebula: Detail Image 1




Credit: NASA, NOAO, ESA, the Hubble Helix Nebula Team, M. Meixner (STScI), and

T.A. Rector (NRAO).

Info


Id: heic0307f
Object: Helix Nebula, NGC 7293, IRAS 22267-2102
Type: Nebula
Instru-ment: ACS, Ground-based

Helix Nebula: Detail Image 2




Credit: NASA, NOAO, ESA, the Hubble Helix Nebula Team, M. Meixner (STScI), and

T.A. Rector (NRAO).

Info


Id: heic0307g
Object: Helix Nebula, NGC 7293, IRAS 22267-2102
Type: Nebula
Instru-ment: ACS, Ground-based

Helix Nebula: Detail Image 3




Credit: NASA, NOAO, ESA, the Hubble Helix Nebula Team, M. Meixner (STScI), and

T.A. Rector (NRAO).

Info


Id: heic0307h
Object: Helix Nebula, NGC 7293, IRAS 22267-2102
Type: Nebula
Instru-ment: ACS, Ground-based

Helix Nebula: Detail Image 4




Credit: NASA, NOAO, ESA, the Hubble Helix Nebula Team, M. Meixner (STScI), and

T.A. Rector (NRAO).

Info


Id: heic0307i
Object: Helix Nebula, NGC 7293, IRAS 22267-2102
Type: Nebula
Instru-ment: ACS, Ground-based

Hubble - The Ghostbuster




The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has caught a glimpse of a colorful cosmic ghost,

the glowing remains of a dying star called NGC 6369. The glowing apparition is known to

amateur astronomers as the 'Little Ghost Nebula, ' because it appears as a small, ghostly

cloud surrounding the faint, dying central star.

Credit: NASA/ESA and The Hubble Heritage Team STScI/AURA)

Info

Press Release
Id: opo0225a
Object: NGC 6369, Little Ghost Nebula, IRAS 17262-2343
Type: Nebula
Instru-ment: WFPC2

A Cosmic Hamburger




Hold the pickles; hold the lettuce. Space is serving up giant hamburgers. The NASA/ESA

Hubble Space Telescope has snapped a photograph of a strange object that bears an

uncanny resemblance to a hamburger.

The object, nicknamed Gomez's Hamburger, is a sun-like star nearing the end of its life. It

already has expelled large amounts of gas and dust and is on its way to becoming a

colorful, glowing planetary nebula. The ingredients for the giant celestial hamburger are

dust and light. The hamburger buns are light reflecting off dust and the patty is the dark

band of dust in the middle.

Credit: NASA/ESA and The Hubble Heritage Team STScI/AURA)

Info

Press Release
Id: opo0219a
Object: IRAS 18059-3211, Gomez's Hamburger, Gomez Nebula
Type: Nebula
Instru-ment: WFPC2

Full Mosaic With Outlines of Detail Sections and Center of Expansion Marked




Credit: NASA/ESA and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)

Info

Press Release
Id: opo0215c
Object: Cassiopeia A, SNR 111.7-02.1,
Type: Nebula
Instru-ment: WFPC2
 

metallicr

Thành Viên CLB Thiên Văn Nghiệp Dư TPHCM - HAAC
Staff member
#54
Details of Supernova Remnant Cassiopeia A




Credit: NASA/ESA and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)

Info

Press Release
Id: opo0215d
Object: Cassiopeia A, SNR 111.7-02.1,
Type: Nebula
Instru-ment: WFPC2

Details of Supernova Remnant Cassiopeia A




Credit: NASA/ESA and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)

Info

Press Release
Id: opo0215e
Object: Cassiopeia A, SNR 111.7-02.1,
Type: Nebula
Instru-ment: WFPC2

Details of Supernova Remnant Cassiopeia A




Credit: NASA/ESA and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)

Info

Press Release
Id: opo0215f
Object: Cassiopeia A, SNR 111.7-02.1,
Type: Nebula
Instru-ment: WFPC2

Full Image: Mosaic of WFPC2 Pointings




Credit: NASA/ESA and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)

Info

Press Release
Id: opo0215b
Object: Cassiopeia A, SNR 111.7-02.1,
Type: Nebula
Instru-ment: WFPC2

Detail 4




Credit: NASA/ESA and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)

Info

Press Release
Id: opo0215g
Object: Cassiopeia A, SNR 111.7-02.1,
Type: Nebula
Instru-ment: WFPC2

A glimpse into the heart of a dying star




This image, taken with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, shows the young

planetary nebula Henize 3-401. Hubble's extraordinary vision reveals that it is one of the

most elongated planetary nebulae found so far. The image shows two very long cylindrical

outflows with intricate thread-like structures and tattered ends. We are seeing the central

star responsible for the beautiful display for the first time in this image. Henize 3-401 is

located in the constellation of Carina (the Keel) at an approximate distance of 10 000

light-years. This picture is composed of three exposures obtained with Hubble's Wide Field

Planetary Camera 2 on 12 June 1997. The three exposures were taken through a wide

orange filter (1200 seconds) shown in blue, a hydrogen-alpha filter (400 seconds) shown in

red, and a singly ionised sulphur filter (1200 seconds) shown in green.

Credit: European Space Agency and Pedro Garcma-Lario (ESA ISO Data Centre)

Info

Id: heic0209a
Object: Hen 3-401
Type: Nebula
Instru-ment: WFPC2

A Giant Star Factory in Neighboring Galaxy NGC 6822




Resembling curling flames from a campfire, this magnificent nebula in a neighboring galaxy

is giving astronomers new insight into the fierce birth of stars, which may have been more

a typical occurrence in the early universe.

The glowing gas cloud, called Hubble-V, has a diameter of about 200 light-years. A faint

tail of gas trailing off the top of this Hubble Space Telescope image sits opposite a dense

cluster of bright stars at the bottom of the irregularly shaped nebula.

Credit: NASA, ESA, and The Hubble Heritage Team STScI/AURA)

Info

Press Release
Id: opo0139a
Object: Hubble-V, Barnard's Galaxy, NGC 6822, IRAS 19421-1455
Type: Nebula
Instru-ment: WFPC2

Hubble-X in galaxy NGC 6822




The saying 'X' marks the spot holds true in this NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope

(HST) image where Hubble-X marks the location of a dramatic burst of star formation,

very much like the Orion Nebula in our Milky Way galaxy, but on a vastly greater scale.

Hubble-X is a glowing gas cloud, one of the most active star-forming regions within galaxy

NGC 6822. The name Hubble-X does not refer to the shape of the gas cloud, but rather is

derived from a catalog of objects in this particular galaxy.

Credit: NASA/ESA and The Hubble Heritage Team STScI/AURA)

Info

Press Release
Id: opo0101a
Object: Hubble-X, Barnard's Galaxy, NGC 6822, IRAS 19421-1455
Type: Galaxy, Nebula
Instru-ment: WFPC2

Trapezium Cluster in the Orion Nebula




Left Image

The brown dwarfs are too dim to be seen in a visible-light image taken by the Hubble

telescope's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2. This view also doesn't show the

assemblage of infant stars seen in the near-infrared image.

Credit: K.L.Luhman(Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge,

Mass.);and G.Schneider, E.Young, G.Rieke, A.Cotera, H.Chen, M.Rieke,

R.Thompson(Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, Ariz.)C.R.O'Dell and

S.K.Wong(Rice University) and NASA/ESA

Info

Press Release
Id: opo0019a
Object: Trapezium Cluster, Orion Nebula, M 42, NGC 1976, Messier 42
Type: Star Cluster, Nebula
Instru-ment: WFPC2, NICMOS

Hubble Surveys Dying Star in the Large Magellanic Cloud




From ground-based telescopes, the glowing gaseous debris surrounding dying, sun-like stars

in a nearby galaxy, called the Large Magellanic Cloud, appear as small, shapeless dots of

light. But through the 'eyes' of the Hubble Space Telescope, these bright dots take on a

variety of shapes, from round to pinwheel-shaped clouds of gas.

Credit: D. Malin, Anglo-Australian Observatory/Royal Observatory, Edinburgh, Scotland,

NASA/ESA; L. Stanghellini, R. Shaw, C. Blades, and M. Mutchler, Space Telescope

Science Institute, Baltimore, Md.; and B. Balick, University of Washington, Seattle, Wash

Info

Press Release
Id: opo0009a
Object: Large Magellanic Cloud, LMC, IRAS 05240-6948, SMP 4, SMP 10, SMP 16,

SMP 27, SMP 30, SMP 93
Type: Galaxy, Nebula
Instru-ment: STIS, Ground-based

A Tantalising Veil




This ground-based image of the Cygnus Loop measures 3 x 2 degrees and was taken with

the Oschin Schmidt Telescope and scanned as part of the Digitized Sky Survey.

Credit: ESA & Digitized Sky Survey (Caltech)

Info

Id: heic0006c
Object: Cygnus Loop, SNR 074.0-08.5, Veil Nebula, NGC 6960, NGC 6995, NGC 6992
Type: Nebula
Instru-ment: Ground-based

Stellar cocoon CRL 618




This image comes from the large archive of scientific observations performed with the

Hubble Space Telescope. Currently more than 250, 000 scientific Hubble observations are

contained in this highly valuable archive and more are added all the time.

In this image singly ionised sulphur is shown in red, green represents neutral hydrogen, the

blue-green colour comes from neutral oxygen and blue light is continuum light seen through

a so-called Strvmgren y filter. The full extent of the nebula is 12 arcseconds from tip to tip.

The original Hubble observations were obtained in 1998 by Susan R. Trammell from

University of North Carolina, and were turned into a colour image by the Hubble European

Space Agency Information Centre at European Southern Observatory, Munich and

A.G.G.M. Tielens from the Kapteyn Astronomical Institute in the Netherlands.

Credit: ESA & A.G.G.M. Tielens (SRON/Kapteyn Astronomical Institute)

Info

Id: heic0004a
Object: IRAS 04395+3601, Westbrook Nebula, RAFGL 618
Type: Nebula
Instru-ment: WFPC2

A Grand View of the Birth of 'Hefty' Stars - 30 Doradus Nebula Details (Hubble

WFPC2 View)




This image is a composite of images in two colours taken with the Hubble Space

Telescope's visible-light camera, the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2(WFPC2).

Credit: NASA/ESA/John Trauger (Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.) and James

Westphal (California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, Calif.)

Info

Press Release
Id: opo9933g
Object: 30 Doradus Nebula, Tarantula Nebula
Type: Nebula
Instru-ment: WFPC2

A Grand View of the Birth of 'Hefty Stars' - 30 Doradus Nebula Details (Hubble

NICMOS View)




The bottom panel is a composite of pictures taken through three infrared filters with

Hubble's Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS). In both cases

the colours of the displays were chosen to correlate with the nebula's and stars' true colors.

Credit: NASA/ESA/Nolan Walborn ( Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, Md.)

and Rodolfo Barba (La Plata Observatory, La Plata, Argentina)

Info

Press Release
Id: opo9933h
Object: 30 Doradus Nebula, Tarantula Nebula
Type: Nebula
Instru-ment: NICMOS

A Butterfly-Shaped 'Papillon Nebula' Yields Secrets of Massive Star Birth




A NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope view of a turbulent cauldron of starbirth, called

N159, taking place 170, 000 light-years away in our satellite galaxy, the Large Magellanic

Cloud (LMC).

Credit: M. Heydari-Malayeri (Paris Observatory) and NASA/ESA

Info

Press Release
Id: opo9923c
Object: IRAS 05240-6948, N159, Large Magellanic Cloud, LMC
Type: Nebula
Instru-ment: WFPC2
 
H

H.Trang

Guest
#56
Có thể ko nhất thiết dịch ra tiếng việt
Nhưng những bài anh gửi ở trên cần dịch ra Tiếng việt :D
 
N

nguyentranha

Guest
#57
Bạn có thể dịch những dòng tiếng Anh khủng khiếp trên được ko? Nếu chỉ cóp từ trang của NASA mà không dịch thì nên để link có lẽ tốt hơn. Lười quá :sm (58):
 

thuyvan

New member
#58
ảnh Tinh Vân đẹp wá nhưng xem em hem hỉu tiếng anh >.< em dốt tiếng anh nhất đó nên anh có thể dịch ra tiếng việt giùm em được hem < sau nay zề phai tu bổ lại cách học tiếng anh chớ hem nhờ dzay ngại wé >
 

eclipse

New member
#59
Chỉ có thể nói là ko thể đẹp hơn, anh có thể dịch cho em phần #38 đc ko ạ
 
#60
Sao chổi và Orion


Hai bức ảnh đầy màu sắc dưới đây được chụp cùng một vị trí: Tinh vân Orion lớn (Great Orion Nebula). Chúng gây nên sự chú ý bởi một thứ thật xa lạ: một sao chổi đang đi ngang qua.

Được chụp vào cuối tuần này bằng một chiếc kính thiên văn học điều khiển từ xa ở bang New Mexico, bức ảnh bên phải chụp ngày 26/09 và bên trái là 27/09/2009. Sao chổi 217P Linear diện một chiếc đuôi màu xanh lá và nằm trên đỉnh tinh vân phản xạ màu xanh có tên Running Man, gần đỉnh của 2 bức ảnh.

Gần hơn và di chuyển cực nhanh xuyên qua bầu trời đêm, vị trí sao chổi thay đổi so với tinh vân và các ngôi sao nền chỉ trong 1 ngày, từ đêm này đến đêm hôm sau.

Trên thực tế, ngày 27/9 sao chổi chỉ cách chúng ta 5 phút ánh sáng, so với 1500 năm ánh sáng của Tinh vân Orion. Thật quá yếu để có thể nhìn với đôi mắt trần, sao chổi 217P Linear là một sao chổi chuyển động trên quỹ đạo của nó với chu kỳ khoảng 8 năm. Ở vị trí xa nhất so với Mặt Trời, quỹ đạo sao chổi được tính toán bằng chiều dài quỹ đạo Sao Mộc trải ra. Vị trí gần nhất so với Mặt Trời, sao chổi này chỉ nằm bên ngoài quỹ đạo của Trái Đất.


PAC
 

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